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Travel Bug Tuesday: Spying on the Enemies in the DMZ

Looking into North Korea from South Korea side of the DMZ and conference row, including South Korean guards standing in the modified Taekwondo stanceFiling out of Freedom House in two straight-lines you could feel the tense nature of our surroundings. We could see into North Korea from here, and North Korea could see us.

Lining up along the top step a North Korean soldier raised his binoculars, examining us from a distance.

Only a hundred feet or so separated us from the North Korean guard still examining us; a hundred feet and three South Korea guards in modified Taekwondo stance there for our protection against ‘the enemy’.

Our guide, an American soldier reminded us of the rules – no pointing, no rude gestures, and only take photographs of certain areas on the South Korea side.
Why no pointing? “Because it will be used in propaganda films in North Korea to prove that you are agreeing with them, so unless you want to be famous in North Korea then I suggest that you don’t point.”

As we walked the length of the top stair we could feel eyes on us, and again as we walked towards the JSA Conference Room. They were spying on ‘the enemies’, though really in many of our eyes we were spying on them.

What are your thoughts on visiting the Korean DMZ?

 

PS: Can’t see the North Korean guard? I’ve highlighted him in red below.

Looking into North Korea from South Korea side of the DMZ and conference row, including South Korean guards standing in the modified Taekwondo stance

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1 Comment

  • Reply
    Victoria
    May 20, 2013 at 8:04 pm

    Great post! We went up to the DMZ last month on a visit to Seoul. I was half hearted about it but felt it was something I should see. We didn’t do the whole JSA bit, just the standard tour as we only had half a day. I still found it interesting and quite surreal that this situation exists in the world today.

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